Amanda is a Hamilton, ON based watercolour painter, sewing instructor, knitter, mother, and generally crafty person!

Please feel free to look around and hopefully be inspired in your own making!

Handmade (Men's) Wardrobe: Button-Down Shirts.

Handmade (Men's) Wardrobe: Button-Down Shirts.

In my frenzied button-down-shirt construction madness a few weeks ago, I made two shirts for Jay, too. First I made the casual Negroni shirt from Colette Patterns, then I made the adjusted version as detailed on Male Pattern Boldness. Making a man's shirt was a different experience for me, since I am so used to crazy patterns and colours and style lines of women's clothing. Suddenly every little detail and aspect of the shirt felt more important. Suddenly the number of pockets, the shape of the cuffs and collar all felt more meaningful. 

The first shirt was a muslin of sorts (a muslin is like a practice outfit to test for fit). I did finish it completely the way it is intended, so Jay has been wearing it since the fit was perfect the first time around (yay!). However, the fabric is a smidge itchy so it's not his favourite. 

The second one we made from 100% cotton and I decided I hated the camp collar that comes with the pattern (or should I say, I hate turning tiny tubes of fabric inside-out for the neck button), so I followed the guidelines on the Male Pattern Boldness sew-along for converting this shirt to a classic dress shirt. This meant turning the facings into button plackets and drafting a new collar and collar stand (partially borrowed from my Archer Shirt Pattern). 

I also switched the cuff pleat into two pleats on the fly. 

I also switched the cuff pleat into two pleats on the fly. 

Jay requested that I add collar stay channels into the underside of the collar. Then he had to show me what he was talking about because I HAD NO IDEA THESE EXISTED. They are basically little plastic points that stick in the collar and keep it straight and pointy. I achieved this by cutting the under collar twice, laying them together and pressing the edge of the top layer down at an angle towards the collar edge. Then I sewed two parallel lines towards the collar point. Success! Then I felt so proud of myself for figuring it out on my own, without the internet. Ha!

Anyways, I see more men's shirts in the future since making it felt really great. I don't love sewing things for other people (I would rather show them how to do it) because I feel like people don't appreciate the time that goes into the details of something like this, but Jay was really appreciative and grateful and I get to see him wear it now, all the time! 

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